doctorcrowd:

Phantamasgoric Capitalism: Benjamin’s Arcades Today

In an overcrowded and claustrophobic city, social space becomes both a geographical and a psychological phenomenon. The latter dimension is perhaps more apparent in a city such as London, where traditionally, different classes, cultures, and ethnicities have tended to live cheek by jowl in many areas, in contrast to the ghettoisation of cities, e.g., in the USA. This heterogeneity is, however, very clearly the target of the next phase of capitalist valorisation in London.

Source: 3:AM Magazine

(vía urbanscenarios)

archimaps:

On the Market Square, Tours

humanscalecities:

The Wheeled City - With Eve In Copenhagen" is a 1932 British newsreel showing the proliferation of bicycles along with pedestrians, streetcars and some cars in the Danish capital. 

visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)
visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)
visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)
visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)
visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)
visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)
visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)
visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays
It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.
The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.
I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.
If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!
(Photos: bloggers own)

visualfairytales:

New season, new window displays

It’s that time again! Sale is disappearing more and more from the stores, that means..time for the new collection of fall 2014! I just visited department store ‘de Bijenkorf’ in Amsterdam. They (often) have the best window displays. For people who haven’t heard of the Bijenkorf, you could compare it to Printemps Haussmann in Paris, Harrods in London, Selfridges or Bergdorf Goodman’s.

The theme of de Bijenkorf display is ‘Urban Playground’. They visual team makes full use of their window space, in depth and height. You see very divers settings and props, with the recurring bicycle. Whether it is in a wooden wheel, a sticker, a chain, old parts, or a complete bike. A clever way to create the dept is by using the bicycle sticker on the window and placing the wooden wheel in the space, making the bike complete. The mannequins are wearing a mix of brands in different styles with a great finishing touch.

I like the girl in the kids window, holding the spray can and spraying the paint on the window. The kids window displays have a real playfulness by the use of the sidewalk tile hopscotch and chalk, the skate ramp and the suggestion of movement / playing.

If your ever in Amsterdam, de Bijenkorf is definately worth a visit!

(Photos: bloggers own)

keyframedaily:

Bruno Ganz and Peter Falk in Wim Wenders’s Wings of Desire (1987).

(vía architectureofdoom)

postermuseum:

In 1954 Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns began what would arguably come to be the greatest creative collaboration in the art world since Braque and Picasso jointly invented cubism half a century earlier. Rauschenberg and Johns worked collaboratively for a number of years, were friends, shared…

archimaps:

The Magasins Modernes Au Capitole, Toulouse

gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands

“In the summer of 1937, Tony Sarg and several others promoted a hoax in Nantucket. Sightings of a sea serpent were advertised… footprints were found… stories published… Then, the serpent appeared on South Beach: it was one of Sarg’s Macy’s Day Parade balloons. “Tony Sarg (1880-1942) was an American puppeteer, illustrator, designer and painter. He is famous for creating balloons for the Macy department store parades and many illustrations for magazines. He owned a store in Nantucket, the Tony Sarg’s Curiosity Shop. “All of Nantucket must have visited. There are photos of this “sea-serpent” from many scrapbooks of the era.” - Nantucket Historical Association (vía Tony Sarg’s sea monster hoax | Retronaut)

atlurbanist:

Saying goodbye, slowly, to the suburban experiment

Lewis Mumford (1895-1990) was an interesting guy. Among many other things, we was a fan of cities and good urban planning. He also gave a warning voice against the rise of car-centric suburbia as it was happening in the 20th century. Here’s a quote from him, emphasis from me:

In the suburb one might live and die without marring the image of an innocent world, except when some shadow of evil fell over a column in the newspaper. Thus the suburb served as an asylum for the preservation of illusion. Here domesticity could prosper, oblivious of the pervasive regimentation beyond. This was not merely a child-centered environment; it was based on a childish view of the world, in which reality was sacrificed to the pleasure principle.

Perspective: car-centric, suburban sprawl is a construct of the 20th century that clashes with the way human settlements developed and thrived for millennia. It reconstructed our living spaces on a scale meant for cars, making our neighborhoods inhospitable to the kind of pedestrian connectivity that we need for healthy interactivity with our environments and with  each other.

Some day that sprawl will be fully retro-fitted as the kind of walkable, compact environment that puts people in face-to-face contact more so than what happens now via windshield perspectives; respecting both basic human needs and also the land-space needs of nature. This is happening now slowly, in our lifetimes, but the damage is significant and the repair will take many years.

Future generations will look back on the suburban experiment of the 20th century as the bizarre, unnatural thing that it was. Knowing that makes me feel a bit better about how slow the process is of undoing the physical and psychological detritus of the experiment.

(vía urbnist)

gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
 

gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

Via

While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.

“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.

He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.

 

archimaps:

The Château d’Eau and the Palace of Electricity at the Exposition Universelle in 1900, Paris