gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
gasoline-station:

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now
by NYU Stern Urbanization Project
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands
leradr:

Iraq’s Marshlands

“In the summer of 1937, Tony Sarg and several others promoted a hoax in Nantucket. Sightings of a sea serpent were advertised… footprints were found… stories published… Then, the serpent appeared on South Beach: it was one of Sarg’s Macy’s Day Parade balloons. “Tony Sarg (1880-1942) was an American puppeteer, illustrator, designer and painter. He is famous for creating balloons for the Macy department store parades and many illustrations for magazines. He owned a store in Nantucket, the Tony Sarg’s Curiosity Shop. “All of Nantucket must have visited. There are photos of this “sea-serpent” from many scrapbooks of the era.” - Nantucket Historical Association (vía Tony Sarg’s sea monster hoax | Retronaut)

atlurbanist:

Saying goodbye, slowly, to the suburban experiment

Lewis Mumford (1895-1990) was an interesting guy. Among many other things, we was a fan of cities and good urban planning. He also gave a warning voice against the rise of car-centric suburbia as it was happening in the 20th century. Here’s a quote from him, emphasis from me:

In the suburb one might live and die without marring the image of an innocent world, except when some shadow of evil fell over a column in the newspaper. Thus the suburb served as an asylum for the preservation of illusion. Here domesticity could prosper, oblivious of the pervasive regimentation beyond. This was not merely a child-centered environment; it was based on a childish view of the world, in which reality was sacrificed to the pleasure principle.

Perspective: car-centric, suburban sprawl is a construct of the 20th century that clashes with the way human settlements developed and thrived for millennia. It reconstructed our living spaces on a scale meant for cars, making our neighborhoods inhospitable to the kind of pedestrian connectivity that we need for healthy interactivity with our environments and with  each other.

Some day that sprawl will be fully retro-fitted as the kind of walkable, compact environment that puts people in face-to-face contact more so than what happens now via windshield perspectives; respecting both basic human needs and also the land-space needs of nature. This is happening now slowly, in our lifetimes, but the damage is significant and the repair will take many years.

Future generations will look back on the suburban experiment of the 20th century as the bizarre, unnatural thing that it was. Knowing that makes me feel a bit better about how slow the process is of undoing the physical and psychological detritus of the experiment.

(vía urbnist)

gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
  gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’
Via
While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.
“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.
He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.
 

gasoline-station:

The Miniature Model Behind ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

Via

While “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is busy with smaller design elements, one of its most striking designs is the hotel itself. Outfitted in shades of pink and purple and situated atop a hill, the hotel is grandiose and picturesque. It also happens to be nine feet tall. For wide shots of the hotel, the director Wes Anderson and his team decided to use a handmade miniature model.

“I’ve always loved miniatures in general,” Mr. Anderson said, speaking by phone from Paris. “I just like the charm of them.” He used miniatures in “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” and more extensively in “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” He said he feels that audiences tend to recognize what is artificial, whether in computer-generated effects or otherwise, and that gave him liberty to use models. “The particular brand of artificiality that I like to use is an old-fashioned one,” he added.

He collaborated again with the production designer Adam Stockhausen (“Moonrise Kingdom”) to come up with the look of the hotel, then had it built by a crew. Here is a closer look at the hotel, including commentary and ideas from Mr. Stockhausen.

 

archimaps:

The Château d’Eau and the Palace of Electricity at the Exposition Universelle in 1900, Paris

booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library. booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library. booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library. booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 
In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.
He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”
Read more at the British Library.

booksnbuildings:

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 

In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.

He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”

Read more at the British Library.

malformalady:

These 5,000-year-old trees have emerged on a beach in Mid Wales after peat was washed away during the recent storms. Thought to date back to the Bronze Age, the shin-high stumps became visible for the first time when the peat which once covered them was washed away in torrential rain and waves pounding the shore. The oak and yew stumps were once part of a forest that covered the whole area before it turned into a peat bog and was eventually overwhelmed by water.

Photo credit: Keith Morris/LNP

(vía architectureofdoom)

“A city exists for the sake of a good life - not for the sake of life only”
— Aristotle (via kamigami)

(vía thisbigcity)

“Lo que le importa a mi Marco Polo es descubrir las razones secretas que han llevado a los hombres a vivir en las ciudades, razones que puedan valer más allá de todas las crisis. Las ciudades son un conjunto de muchas cosas: memorias, deseos, signos de un lenguaje; son lugares de trueque, como explican todos los libros de historia de la economía, pero estos trueques no lo son sólo de mercancías, son también trueques de palabras, de deseos, de recuerdos.”

LAS CIUDADES INVISIBLES 

Italo Calvino, SIRUELA, 2012

publicdesignfestival:

Street art improves commuters’ waiting time, urban furniture and ordinary landscapes. Inattesa. art at the bus stop is a project by Turismo Creativo and Ziguline taking place in Formia, Gaeta, Itri and Terracina (Italy). 
Photos by: Flavia Fiengo and Arianna Barone _ All rights reserved. publicdesignfestival:

Street art improves commuters’ waiting time, urban furniture and ordinary landscapes. Inattesa. art at the bus stop is a project by Turismo Creativo and Ziguline taking place in Formia, Gaeta, Itri and Terracina (Italy). 
Photos by: Flavia Fiengo and Arianna Barone _ All rights reserved. publicdesignfestival:

Street art improves commuters’ waiting time, urban furniture and ordinary landscapes. Inattesa. art at the bus stop is a project by Turismo Creativo and Ziguline taking place in Formia, Gaeta, Itri and Terracina (Italy). 
Photos by: Flavia Fiengo and Arianna Barone _ All rights reserved. publicdesignfestival:

Street art improves commuters’ waiting time, urban furniture and ordinary landscapes. Inattesa. art at the bus stop is a project by Turismo Creativo and Ziguline taking place in Formia, Gaeta, Itri and Terracina (Italy). 
Photos by: Flavia Fiengo and Arianna Barone _ All rights reserved. publicdesignfestival:

Street art improves commuters’ waiting time, urban furniture and ordinary landscapes. Inattesa. art at the bus stop is a project by Turismo Creativo and Ziguline taking place in Formia, Gaeta, Itri and Terracina (Italy). 
Photos by: Flavia Fiengo and Arianna Barone _ All rights reserved. publicdesignfestival:

Street art improves commuters’ waiting time, urban furniture and ordinary landscapes. Inattesa. art at the bus stop is a project by Turismo Creativo and Ziguline taking place in Formia, Gaeta, Itri and Terracina (Italy). 
Photos by: Flavia Fiengo and Arianna Barone _ All rights reserved.

publicdesignfestival:

Street art improves commuters’ waiting time, urban furniture and ordinary landscapes. Inattesa. art at the bus stop is a project by Turismo Creativo and Ziguline taking place in Formia, Gaeta, Itri and Terracina (Italy).

Photos by: Flavia Fiengo and Arianna Barone _ All rights reserved.

let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs
by Marcus Lyon
"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."
let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs
by Marcus Lyon
"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."
let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs
by Marcus Lyon
"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."
let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs
by Marcus Lyon
"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."
let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs
by Marcus Lyon
"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."
let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs
by Marcus Lyon
"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."
let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs
by Marcus Lyon
"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."

let-s-build-a-home:

BRICs

by Marcus Lyon

"In 2008, a watershed was crossed and the world saw the irreversible shift from a global majority of rural dwellers to a new army of urban residents.  Mass urbanisation trends predict that the world’s urban population will double in the coming 40 years. The cities of the developing world will account for 95% of that growth. These are the megacities of the BRIC economies, the urban giants of Brazil, Russia, India and China. These people-magnets draw in rural workers with the promise of higher wages and a better quality of life, but the delicate balance between expanding population and limited physical space defines the human condition of these powerhouses."

(vía gasoline-station)